Friday, June 8, 2012

C is for Case of the Imaginary Detective

The Case of the Imaginary Detective

What happens when your godmother not only makes your father a character in her book but also goes ahead and presents him as a murderer, of his wife, no less?




This is the interesting premise that gripped me when I started reading Karen Joy Fowler's The Case of the Imaginary Detective. Rima’s life has had its share of loss and pain. In a series of tragedies, she has lost her mother, brother, and father. At twenty nine, adrift in a world with no emotional anchor or relationship, she comes to her godmother’s house. The Godmother is Addison A.B. Early – a writer of mystery books whose creation  - the detective Maxwell Lane - has a massive fan following. He has been enacted on screen and there is a whole lot of fanfiction based on him. The house is strange with dolls’ houses replicating the murder scenes from the novels. The people who live in it – Tilda, the house keeper, her estranged son Martin, the dog walkers Scorch and Cody all have their share of problems. The two women - Rima and Early - are stranger to each other and the question that Rima wants to ask her more than anything else is: "What exactly was it that went on between you and my father?”

Having a publication date of 2009, this novel has a very contemporary feel to it. There is a lot of discussion of readers' involvement in the text; their own take on it; the parallel universe of fan-fiction and how it influences the writer. The book is interesting but doesn't quite live up to its premise.



*

Submitted for letter C in the Crime Fiction Alphabet Meme.

6 comments:

  1. Dear Blogger,

    Glad to see you buzzing again but where is "B"?

    - Nitu

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Reader
      Had no Net connectivity so missed one week.

      Delete
  2. This is a new author for me and it sounds very good!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Peggy for visiting. The book is good for a lazy afternoon.

      Delete
  3. Interesting premis, sad that it doesn't live up to it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, Srivalli. I think some of my greatest disappointments are associated with books that didn't quite deliver.

    ReplyDelete