Thursday, July 16, 2015

Popular Post

One of the things about blogging that I enjoy is the popular post feature. It is fun to see which of your posts has had the maximum number of views. For months now, a post on Agatha Christie's Twelve best books that I did way back in 2012 occupied the number 1 position. So much so that I had even stopped thinking that it'd ever change. But recently there has been a pleasant change. A review of E.P. Oppenheim's The Strange Boarders of Palace Crescent has pushed the Christie post to the second spot. This gladdens my heart tremendously since I not only relished the book but also enjoyed writing a post on it.




So thanks to all those who read it and double thanks to those who made the effort  to leave a comment. You know when you enjoy a book, you want others to respond to that enthusiasm. So thanks a lot Freda, Margot, Prashant, Tracy, and Ann.


10 comments:

  1. Neer, although I have not read E.P. Oppenheim, I believe his work is relevant today and I won't be surprised if he has a good following. He was a popular author in his time.

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    1. Prashant, going by the sheer number of the novels that he has written, I guess that he must have been very-very popular but really can't comment on his present day relevance as I have just read two of his books - one of which was a total dud.

      Do read him and let me know what you think of him.

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  2. As you know I am not a great reader more an odd blogger. And I am always pleased to see that you are still hanging in there doing your reviews. . . . Blogging is a fickle game and it is nice when a few folk appreciate what you do.

    Keep up the good work . . . I think you must have read more books than anyone I know.

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    1. Rob, it is always a pleasure when you come visiting.

      Yeah, blogging can be quite a chore at times esp when your enthusiasm does not receive the kind of response that you had hoped for. :)

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  3. Isn't it interesting to see what impact one's posts have, Neeru? What I find especially interesting is that you might have one impression of a post (e.g. it wasn't very informative, or won't be popular), but readers may see it quite differently.

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    1. Absolutely Margot. I have written posts where I anticipated a grand response and it didn't turn out that way and then there have been posts which I thought would not get any views, let alone responses, and yet they have proved to be popular.

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  4. Neer, I love it that you have reminded me of this author that I have never read, but have intentions to read. He wrote so many books and over such a long period. Very impressive. I am doing an informal challenge to read books for every year between 1915 and 2015 and Oppenheim is a good source for some of the earlier years.

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    1. Wow, that's an interesting challenge. Looking forward to the books that you read for it.

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  5. Dear Neer,

    I apologize for contacting you this way but could not find your email. I am wondering if you might be interested in reading and reviewing my debut mystery, which is set in India.
    My first mystery, "The Girl who went Missing," came out on April 23rd. It is set in Mumbai, India, and though it has mystery written all over it, there is a sliver of romance as well. I wrote it to entertain readers but at the same time I wanted to highlight a socially pressing topic.

    While it's never easy to convert a 245 page (89,616 words) novel into a few paragraphs, here is the synopsis:
    When June Warner arrives in India to visit her sister Thalia, a trip to take her mind off her jilted engagement, she is greeted by the bright hot chaos of Mumbai but not her sister. She goes to the YMCA where Thalia is staying, only to find that she is not there.
    Convinced that Thalia’s no-show is a sign that she is in danger, June begins a desperate search for her younger sister.
    Police Commissioner Oscar D'Costa, scarred by the tragedies of his past, swears he will never again ignore his gut instinct when it comes to a missing girl. And with more and more dead foreign women being found in his precinct, he becomes convinced a conspiracy is at play.
    Through the two worlds of American naiveté and Indian chaos, they must find the girl who went missing.
    If this interests you, I would be delighted to send you a copy that is Kindle friendly. I do have some reviews on Goodreads and Amazon, if you choose to read them. Finally, I don't have a time frame for a review; you get to it when you get to it.

    Thank you so much,
    Ace Varkey
    Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00WJBDQ22/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1429761715&sr=1-1&keywords=Ace+varkey+the+girl+who+went+missing
    GR link:
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25101394-the-girl-who-went-missing?from_search=true&search_exp_group=group_b
    FB link:
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ace-Varkey/979108745446338
    Blog:
    https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13604423.Ace_Varkey/blog

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  6. Dear Ace

    I tried finding your email too but could not do so and so I am replying over here and hope that you read it.

    Thank you so much for considering me good enough to review your book. It feels absolutely great. I love mysteries and rue the fact that there are so few set in India so I absolutely love your choice of location. The plot seems pretty interesting too and I am wondering what happened to Thalia.

    Unfortunately though I do not have a kindle and so I am sorry but I'll not be able to receive the book in that format.

    I wish you all success in your writing career and hope that the book does well enough for you to make a series out of it. I already like the sound of Oscar D'Costa :)

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