Tuesday, March 21, 2017

The Purple Roomby Mauro Casiraghi

The Purple Room The Purple Room by Mauro Casiraghi
My rating: 3 of 5 stars


"We left the courtroom in silence. Without saying a word, we each knew what was going through the other’s mind. Every moment of our life together, from the day we first met, until the exact moment when it all ended. It was the inventory of our successes and failures, many of which weren’t the same. I had mine, she had hers. Standing there, on the stone steps of the courthouse, the moment had come to leave each other for good. To go our separate ways. It was then that we felt the elation of failure. A weight had fallen from our shoulders. At long last we could abandon the struggle to love and respect each other until death do us part. We could stop feeling incompetent and guilty. We had been relieved of our duty. We were fleeing from the battlefield like two deserters. It didn’t really matter that I’d been the first to start running. Now we were the same. Alone again, face to face, just like the day we met."


Sergio has survived an accident that almost killed him but he has gaps in his memory. There is one persistent image however that doesn't let him rest: that of a woman standing against a purple wall. Lost and drifting with a sense that he has failed in his relationships, he feels that life will straighten itself out once he meets the woman again.

"The memory that I have of her, in the purple room, will disappear with me. There will be nothing left. What’s been the point of getting this far? I’d like to be able to ask those who are still pushing on, driven by some incomprehensible force. Roberto and Loredana, clinging to each other in the hope of a child. Nino and Sabrina, wrapped in each other’s arms in a hotel room in Majorca. Franco seeking comfort in Petra’s young bosom. Silvia, in love with her insects. Simonetta, with her lovely voice, full of regrets. Luisa and everyone who frequents her dating agency. Marilena. Antonella. Even Jenny and her twenty customers per night. All willing to pay in the hope of finding something that might not even exist. Trying so hard to love and be loved. Only to lose it all, end up alone, cry, suffer. Then start all over again, driven on by the hope that this time it will be better or, maybe, convinced that it will be worse, but determined to plunge right back in, up to their necks. Maybe to end up like me––staggering towards the memory of a state of grace, of a purple room on a sunny afternoon that no one will ever be able to give back to me."

The book with its poignancy reminded me of Arun Joshi's The Last Labyrinth and I liked Sergio's friendship with Roberto and Franco. Would like to read more of this author.

*

Opening Lines: I stopped waging war on the ants after I got out of the hospital. I don’t kill them anymore.

Other books read of the same author: None

View all my reviews

4 comments:

  1. Sounds interesting, Neeru. And that's certainly an intriguing first line! Those fixations can be fascinating plot points in books. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks for having a look, Margot. Glad that you liked the line. It certainly had me interested.

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  2. What Margot said, Neer. That is an interesting opening line.

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    1. The book also makes you reflect on the human condition, Prashant.

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